Category Archives: Book Reviews

Dissident Dispatches: The Culturist Review

When, at the 2017 American Renaissance Conference, Arktos’ CEO announced they had published a book about Christianity, I cheered. I have long complained of Arktos’ focus on neo-paganism. We need to save the West! Christianity is already nominally adhered to in the West and has a pervasive infrastructure. As such, I’ve argued that Arktos needs to promote the idea of Christendom.

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Book Review: “Mad” by Jonathan Bowden

“If you’re a teenage Nietzschean, you’ll worship this book. If you masturbate to pictures of Ayn Rand, blare Burzum from your iPod speakers, and constantly whine about you’re being oppressed by the untermenschen (despite the fact that you still get an allowance from your parents), Jonathan Bowden’s word salad will be like catnip to you. Just don’t shoot up any schools after you’re done.”

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Book Review: “Faustian Man in a Multicultural Age” by Ricardo Duchesne

“Our civilization cannot be defined by a set of ideas or a thought system, but instead by its very race. And race, far from being a social construct, must not be confused with culture. People like Samuel Huntington would like to present Western man as a universal concept, something everyone and anyone can eventually “buy into,” but experience has proved this thesis wrong. “

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Book Review: “El Salvador: A War by Proxy” by Keith Preston

El Salvador: A War By Proxy by Keith Preston Black House Publishing, 145 Pages Don’t Buy from Amazon here Reviewed by Gilbert Cavanaugh A few weeks ago, I was reading Sam Francis’s Essential Writings on Race at work, and a co-worker I knew to be an anarchist gave the book a queer look and asked about it. As you might imagine, our conversation

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Book Review: “Ruling the Void” by Peter Mair

Written by the Irish political scientist Peter Mair, who died before the book was finished, Ruling The Void is a penetrating account of the steady decline of democracy in Europe. In my view, the book is far better for having been left incomplete: it stands far stronger as a negative assessment of the times than it would had the author racked his Leftist politics for some illusory and half-hearted set of “solutions” to the structural problems he describes.

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